WELCOME TO HUMAN RIGHTS CONCERN - ERITREA (HRCE)
Human Rights Concern - Eritrea (HRCE) is an independent non profit making, human rights organization based in UK. The organization is dedicated to the promotion and protection of the human rights of Eritreans at home and all over the world. HRCE believes that all human beings are equal regardless of race, religion, gender and political affiliation and strives for a peaceful Eritrea where fundamental human rights are respected.

How Much More Mistreatment Before Mr. Tesfagaber Haile Desta Can be Reunited with His Daughter?

A 52-year-old Eritrean former political prisoner, who fled his country after being tortured systematically, and who subsequently endured several beatings at the hands officers at the immigration and detention Centre in Brussels after seeking asylum there is currently sitting in a cold metal chair in an Ethiopian airport, resisting attempts to deport him to either South Sudan, Uganda or Eritrea.  Continue reading

Awate: “Mistir Leyti”: Secret of The Night

(Awate.com, Tzigereda Haile, Feb 10, 2016)  During the struggle (Ghedli), the Tigrinya phrase for “password” was “misTir Leyti”: secret of the night. Usually, it was the name of a martyr, shared and circulated per whisper up to the tegadalay (combatant) serving in the frontline. Practiced throughout the whole Liberation Front and renewed on a daily basis, it was crucial for the survival of a military unit, especially during the night. It served to identify a comrade and rule out any risk of an intruder or enemy respectively. When darkness falls, the first thing you would ask any suspected moving person is “dew bel, men iKa,mistir leyti!” (Halt, who are you, name the password!) If the person in question cannot immediately render a correct response, he would be in serious trouble. So, you memorize it. The guards in charge for the night shift (Hares) are assigned alternately. Continue reading

Israel’s Unwanted African Migrants

 (BBC NEWS, Kathy Harcombe, 3 February 2016) BBCNewsFor nearly a year Israel has been offering African migrants cash and the chance to go and live in what is supposed to be a safe haven in a third country – but the BBC has spoken to two men who say that they were abandoned as soon as they got off the plane. One was immediately trafficked, the other left to fend for himself without papers.

Asylum seekers stage a protest by leaning against the fence of the Holot detention centre

Asylum seekers stage a protest by leaning against the fence of the Holot detention centre

Continue reading

Awate.com: On the Wings of Malice and Idiocy

New York Speakers

Meaza Petros, Saleh Yonus, Mezgebe Mengstu, Sheila B. Keetharuth, Sengal Weldetensae, Elizabeth Chyrum and Zerai Petros

(Awate.com, Saleh Younis, Jan 6, 2016) Observing the government of Eritrea and its functionaries, one is always struck which one of their two wings is heavier: the malicious one or the stupid one? One can build a case for either one, and it is a running debate among the Eritrean opposition and the silent majority. In an article that appeared at madote.com under the heading of “United Nation Commission of inquiry on Human Rights in Eritrea will face inevitable legal challenges”, a Yemane Tsegay who is an “M.S. Aerospace Engineer/Legal Advocacy” is attempting to make his case to support the heading of the article… What struck me is the photo that madote.com, Tesfanews’ poor sister, chose to accompany the article.  A photo that was originally published by awate.  Choosing the picture conclusively shows that the stupid wing is heavier than the malicious wing.

Read the full article at awate.com here

Eritrean activist reflects on Malta’s dark hour in 2002

Eritrean human rights activist Elsa Chyrum meets former President George Abela (right) and Fr Dionysus Mintoff from the Peace Lab, with whom she worked in vain to stop the deportation of 220 Eritreans in 2002. Photo: Jesuit Refugee Service

Eritrean human rights activist Elsa Chyrum meets former President George Abela (right) and Fr Dionysus Mintoff from the Peace Lab, with whom she worked in vain to stop the deportation of 220 Eritreans in 2002. Photo: Jesuit Refugee Service

(Times of Malta, Philip Leone-Ganado, ) Elsa Chyrum had never visited Malta before this week, but still, the country holds deeply unhappy memories. In 2002, the Eritrean human rights activist was one of the protagonists in one of Malta’s darkest moments: when 220 Eritrean refugees were forcibly returned to their country to face immediate arrest and brutal torture. Continue reading

Invitation to Civil Society Event on the Valletta Summit

Valletta Summit on MigrationDate:  11 November 2015

Time: 9.30 – 12.00hrs

Venue: Old University, St Paul Street, Valletta

 

Aditus FoundationIntegra Foundation and Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) Malta, in collaboration with the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) Europe and the Migration and Development civil society (MADE) network in Africa, invite you to attend the civil society event on the Valletta Summit. Continue reading

Britain refusing asylum to Eritreans on back of discredited report (The Guardian)

The Guardian(The Guardian, Kate Lyons, 9 September, 2015) The researchers behind a report on Eritrea which the Home Office cited heavily when claiming it was now safe to send Eritrean asylum seekers back to the east African country have publicly distanced themselves from the findings, claiming the report was unsubstantiated and distorted. Continue reading

The Roots and Evo­lu­tions of YPFDJ, in search for 2nd gen­er­a­tion cadres

YPFDJ, Meseret Bahlbi, Yeman Gebreab

YPFDJ, Meseret Bahlbi, Yeman Gebreab

(fithinews.com, Biniam Yohannes, Feb 10, 2016) A decade after inde­pen­dence, the Eritrean People’s Lib­er­a­tion Front (EPLF), which won the war of inde­pen­dence from Ethiopian coloni­sa­tion in 1991, had started becom­ing the very enemy it drove out dur­ing its 30-​year pop­u­lar strug­gle. In 1994, a year after a national ref­er­en­dum almost unan­i­mously voted for inde­pen­dence from Ethiopia, the party had dropped the word ‘Lib­er­a­tion’ from its name and added ‘Democ­racy and Jus­tice’. A national army was set up, an Eritrean cur­rency cir­cu­lated and a new con­sti­tu­tion rat­i­fied. The first seven years of inde­pen­dence seemed to hold true promise for the future of the newly inde­pen­dent nation. But, even before the eupho­ria of inde­pen­dence had worn off, a bor­der war broke out between Ethiopia and Eritrea in 1998. The war took a heavy toll on Eritrean pol­i­tics, soci­ety and the econ­omy. By 2001, a blame game within the party about the han­dling of the war had led to the impris­on­ment of major politicians(G15) and army com­man­ders. The free press was shut down, the econ­omy slowed and any free­doms that the peo­ple had enjoyed for the few years between inde­pen­dence and the war were taken away. Continue reading

Court Rules in Favour of Mirjam van Reisen

Amsterdam court decides Mirjam van Reise not guilty of libel and slander for comments she made based on research. It says “evidence based criticism” in the Netherlands are legitimate although still the court fails to prove specifically if Meseret Bahlbi was or has ever been a “spy” of the Eritrean government in the Netherlands.

Amsterdam court decides Mirjam van Reise not guilty of libel and slander for comments she made based on research. It says “evidence based criticism” in the Netherlands are legitimate although still the court fails to prove specifically if Meseret Bahlbi was or has ever been a “spy” of the Eritrean government in the Netherlands.

(bellaafrica.com, Reinhardt Jacobsen, Feb 10, 2016) A Court in Amsterdam struck down Meseret Bahlbi lawsuit against Mirjam van Reisen, Dutch professor and human rights advocate. The judge found that she was not guilty of libel and slander and that the youth party of the Eritrean government can be seen as a means of collecting intelligence abroad. Continue reading

Authoritarianism in Eritrea and the Migrant Crisis

Eritrean migrant women

Eritrean migrant women

(Council On Foreign Relations, Zachary Laub, Online Writer/Editor
November 11, 2015) Tens of thousands of Eritreans have arrived at Europe’s shores in recent years seeking asylum. They make up a significant share of the unprecedented stream of migrants and refugees making their way to the European Union, undertaking dangerous journeys while challenging the bloc to find a collective response consistent with refugee law. Continue reading

Don’t give money to Eritrea, activist tells EU

news24.com(news24, Nov 11, 2015) Valletta – Eritrea, the African country that supplies the most asylum seekers to Europe, does not deserve any financial aid from the international community, an exiled human rights campaigner said on Wednesday.

“Eritrea has become one of the most paranoid, repressive and secretive countries in the world,” Elizabeth Chyrum, director of Human Rights Concern – Eritrea, said before a meeting of European and African leaders in Valletta. Continue reading

UN Security Council: Report of the Monitoring Group on Somalia and Eritrea

United Nations - Security Council[Summary] Throughout its mandate, the Monitoring Group on Somalia and Eritrea kept the Government of Eritrea fully informed of its lines of investigation and sought to include its views and input in the report, based on their substantial value and as they related to the mandate. Its repeated requests notwithstanding, the Group was not permitted to visit Eritrea during its mandate and did not obtain the Government’s full cooperation, contrary to Security Council resolution 2182 (2014). Continue reading

Open Letter to Rt Hon. David Cameron MP

Human-Rights-Concern-Eritrea-150x150HRCE director, Elizabeth Chyrum, sends an open letter to Rt Hon. David Cameron MP expressing deep concern on the Home Office’s permission of the UKBA to use a completely discredited Danish report as the criteria for determining the outcome of applications filed by Eritrean asylum-seekers who have fled from the open-ended national service characterised by UN and human rights agencies as forced labour or as a modern form of slavery. Read the full letter below: Continue reading